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Swimming and Contacts Don't Mix

It's the summer and one of the most common questions eye doctors are asked is, “Is it safe to swim in my contact lenses?” The answer we give is...


Why do I need glasses if I have contact lenses?

There is an old adage in the eye care industry: Glasses are a necessity, contact lenses are a luxury. Ninety-nine percent of the time this is...


Can you guess the most dangerous sports for eye injuries?

Philadelphia Phillies prospect Matt Imhof lost his right eye in 2016 after suffering a freak injury during a normal training session. He was the...


Are My Eyes Changing Colors?

It can be common that eye doctors get patients who come in asking if the white part of their eye, the sclera, has a growth or is turning a gray...


Eye Safety on the 4th of July

Fireworks Eye Injuries Have More Than Doubled in Recent Years Fireworks sales will be blazing across the country from now through the Fourth of...


Allergies are one of the most common eye conditions

Ocular allergies are among the most common eye conditions to hit people of all ages. Though typically worse in the high allergy seasons of spring...



Living an overall healthy life is good for your eyes. Healthy vision starts with healthy eating and exercise habits.

There's more to complete eye health than just carrots. Are you eating food that promotes the best vision possible? Learn what foods boost your eye well-being and help protect against diseases. Here are important nutrients to look for when selecting your foods.

  • Beta carotene or Vitamin A (helps the retina function smoothly): carrots and apricots
  • Vitamin C (reduce risk of macular degeneration and cataracts): citrus and blueberries
  • Vitamin E (hinders progression of cataracts and AMD): almonds and sunflower seeds
  • Riboflavin (helps your eyes adapt in changes in light): broccoli and bell peppers
  • Lutein (antioxidant to maintain health while aging): spinach and avacado
  • Zinc (transfers vitamin A to the retina for eye-protective melanin productions and helps with night vision): beans and soy beans
  • DHA (helps prevent Dry Eye): Fatty fish like salmon and tuna

Keep in mind, cooked food devalues the precious live enzymes, so some of these foods are best eaten raw.

 

Video credit: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NEI/NIH) (https://nei.nih.gov/)

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