Need Help Finding Something?

Vision Problems Can Happen After A Concussion

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that more than 1.6 million people in the United States suffer a concussion - or traumatic brain injury -...


Want To See Better? Live a Healthy Lifestyle

Living an overall healthy life is good for your eyes. Healthy vision starts with healthy eating and exercise habits. There's more to complete eye...


Through a Mother’s Eyes

Motherhood.., the sheer sound of it brings enduring memories. A mother’s touch, her voice, her cooking, and the smile of approval in her eyes....


UV Damage in Childhood

The Sixties.............War, peace, expressing yourself, the Civil Rights movement, and the Beatles. One of the biggest hits of the era was “Here...


Why is my eye twitching?

Have you ever felt a twitching sensation in your eye? Were you sure everyone was looking at you because of it? Worried it is the beginning of a big...


What Kind of Eye Correction Do I Need for Sports?

There are many options available to adults and children when it comes to wearing corrective lenses (glasses and contacts) when engaged in physical...



There are many options available to adults and children when it comes to wearing corrective lenses (glasses and contacts) when engaged in physical activities.

Here is a look at the different modalities and the pros and cons of each:

Prescription Sports Goggles (i.e. Rec Specs)

The main benefits of goggles when playing sports are stability of vision and eye protection. When playing fast-moving sports, like basketball, soccer, rugby, etc., elbows, wrists, and heads are flying around at high speed, increasing the risk of eye injury. The eyes and eye sockets can be protected when covered by shatter-proof lenses. Additionally, there is no worry of having a contact lens pop out of your eye, which can be a debilitating experience for some people. The main drawback to goggles is that they can be cumbersome, decrease peripheral vision, and fog up. Additionally, very high prescriptions might not be available to make due to frame limitations. On the whole, this is a very good option for many people. One additional advantage to sports goggles is that in many cases you can have the lens made out Transition glasses, so the lens darkens in sunlight and lightens as it gets darker.

Contact Lenses

Far and away the best option for correction when playing sports is contact lenses, particularly soft contact lenses. The main benefits include full field of vision, no fogging of lenses, and obviously no unsightly, heavy glasses on your face. But where sports goggles shine, contact lenses fall short: higher risk of injury, possibly less-stable vision (especially when wearing multifocal or astigmatic lenses), and the potential of a lens falling out during activities. With modern contact lenses, this rarely happens, however. Gas permeable (hard) lenses are not recommended for sports.

Wearing Nothing!

For those whose prescriptions are not so high as to prevent proper functioning without correction, wearing no correction whatsoever is a fine choice. I’m often asked by parents whether their child absolutely needs to wear correction when they are playing sports. The answer is, it depends on how high the prescription is and the activity in which the child is engaged. If someone can see well enough to perform tasks without being hindered, not wearing any correction is perfectly fine.

There are plenty of options available for athletes. Visit your eye doctor to see what the best option is for your particular needs.

Article contributed by Dr. Jonathan Gerard

OUR MISSION:

Our doctors and vision care team are committed to providing the highest standard of eye care with personalized service and cutting edge quality products in a friendly and caring atmosphere.  It is our hope to maintain a nurturing and cooperative environment